1800 US-18 BYP P.O. Box: 692
Hot Springs, SD 57747 United States
Book Now
Donate Now
Gift Shop

Criteria for Merit Badge

Criteria for Geology Merit Badge

[Items in bold are covered by The Mammoth Site]
[Items in italics should be covered by scouts before arriving at The Mammoth Site]

1. Define geology. Discuss how geologists learn about rock formations. In geology, explain why the study of the present is important to understanding the past.

2. Pick three resources that can be extracted or mined from Earth for commercial use. Discuss with your counselor how each product is discovered and processed.

3. Review a geologic map of your area with your counselor and discuss the different rock types and estimated ages of rocks represented. Determine whether the rocks are horizontal, folded, or faulted, and explain how you arrived at your conclusion.

4. Do ONE of the following:

A. With your parent’s and counselor’s approval, visit with a geologist, land use planner, or civil engineer. Discuss this professional’s work and the tools required in this line of work. Learn about a project that this person is now working on, and ask to see reports and maps created for this project. Discuss with your counselor what you have learned. (Advanced Paleontology Dig Class)

B. Learn about the career opportunities available in geology. Pick one that interests you and explain how to prepare for such a career. Discuss what courses might be useful for such a career. You may use resources found on the Internet (with your parent’s permission), at the library, in books and articles from periodicals, from television programs, and at school.

5. Earth History Option (Option D from Handbook)

1. Create a chart showing suggested geological eras and periods. Determine which period the rocks in your region might have been formed.

2. Explain to your counselor the processes of burial and fossilization, and discuss the concept of extinction. Identify three plants or animals on the threatened or endangered list of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

3. Explain to your counselor how fossils provide information about ancient life, environment, climate, and geography. Discuss the following terms and explain how animals from each habitat obtain food: benthonic, pelagic, littoral, lacustrine, open marine, brackish, fluvial, eolian, protected reef.

4. Collect 10 different fossil plants or animals. Record in a notebook where you obtained (found, bought, traded) each one. Classify each specimen to the best of your ability, and explain how each one might have survived and obtained food. Tell what else you can learn from these fossils.

5. Do ONE of the following:

A. Visit a science museum or the geology department of a local university that has fossils on display. With your parent’s and counselor’s approval, before you go, make an appointment with a curator or guide who can show you how the fossils are preserved and prepared for display.

B. Visit a structure in your area that was built using fossiliferous rocks. Determine what kind of rock was used and tell your counselor the kinds of fossil evidence you found there.

geo_badge

Criteria for Archeology Merit Badge

[Items in bold are covered by The Mammoth Site]
[Items in italics should be covered by scouts before arriving at The Mammoth Site]

1. Tell what archaeology is and explain how it differs from anthropology, geology, paleontology, and history.

2. Describe each of the following steps of the archaeological process: site location, site excavation, artifact identification and examination, interpretation, preservation, and information sharing.

3. Describe at least two ways in which archaeologists determine the age of sites, structures, or artifacts. Explain what relative dating is.

4. Do TWO of the following:

A. Learn about three archaeological sites located outside the United States.

B. Learn about three archaeological sites located with the United States.

C. Visit an archaeological site and learn about it. (tour – The Mammoth Site began as an archaeological investigation)

For EACH site you research for options a, b, or c, point it out on a map and explain how it was discovered. Describe some of the information about the past that has been found at each site. Explain how the information gained from the study of these sites answers questions that archaeologists are asking and how the information may be important to modern people. Compare the relative ages of the sites you research.

Resources

http://www.mammothsite.com/Tour.html

http://www.elephant.se/mammoth_bone_houses.php?open=Man%20and%20elephants

http://www.az.blm.gov/cultural/preserve.htm

http://lithiccastinglab.com/gallery-pages/2001septemberlangefergusonpage1.htm

The Mammoth Site program covers option ‘D’ in the handbook.

5. Choose ONE of the sites you picked for requirement 4 and give a short presentation about your findings to a Cub Scout pack, your Scout troop, your school class, or another group.

6. Do the following:

A. Explain why it is important to protect archaeological sites.

B. Explain what people should do if they think they have found an artifact.

C. Describe the ways in which you can be a protector of the past.

7. Do ONE of the following:

A. Make a list of items you would include in a time capsule. Discuss with your merit badge counselor what archaeologists a thousand years from now might learn from the contents of your capsule about you and the culture in which you live.
B. Make a list of the trash your family throws out during one week. Discuss with your counselor what archaeologists a thousand years from now might learn about your trash and your family.

8. Do ONE of the following:

A. Under the supervision of a qualified archaeologist, spend at least eight hours helping to excavate an archaeological site.

B. Under the supervision of a qualified archaeologist, spend at least eight hours in an archaeological laboratory helping to prepare artifacts for analysis, storage, or display.

C. If you are unable to work in the field or in a laboratory under the supervision of a qualified archaeologist, you may substitute a mock dig. To find out how to make a mock dig, talk with a professional archaeologist, trained avocational archaeologist, museum school instructor, junior high or high school science teacher, adviser from a local archaeology society, or other qualified instructor. Plan what you will bury in your artificial site to show use of your “site” during two time periods. (Advanced Paleontology Dig, Junior Paleontology Dig)

9. Under the supervision of a qualified archaeologist or instructor, do ONE of the following:

A. Help prepare an archaeological exhibit for display in a museum, visitor center, school, or other public area.
B. Use the methods of experimental archaeology to re-create an item or to practice a skill from the past. Write a brief report explaining the experiment and its results. (Atlatl Hunting Class)

10. Do ONE of the following:

A. Research American Indians who live or once lived in your area. Find out about traditional lifeways, dwellings, clothing styles, arts and crafts, and methods of food gathering, preparation, and storage. Describe what you would expect to find at an archaeological site for these people.
B. Research settlers or soldiers who were in your area at least 100 years ago. Find out about the houses or forts, ways of life, clothing styles, arts and crafts, and dietary habits of the early settlers, farmers, ranchers, soldiers, or townspeople who once lived in the area where your community now stands. Describe what you would expect to find at an archaeological site for these people.

11. Identify three career opportunities in archaeology. Pick one and explain how to prepare for such a career. Discuss with your counselor what education and training are required, and tell why this profession might interest you.

Archaeology

Our Visitors Say It Best…

leaf“The Mammoth Site is not just a window into the past—it’s as close to being a true time machine as you’ll find, with some of the best ice-age fossils on the planet on permanent display.”
Ross MacPhee,
Division of Vertebrate Zoology,
American Museum of Natural History, New York City

leaf“The students examined fossil and non-fossil examples then made their own fossil imprints. The students had great fun and loved the activity.”
Savage Branch Library
Howard County, MD

leaf“We used the Kindergarten through 5th grade kits for an evening program and presentation. The parents were very impressed and the teachers loved the completeness of the lesson plans. They were easy to work with also during class time.”
Meeker Elementary School District,
Meeker, CO